What’s Next for Figure Skating at the 2018 Winter Olympics

Adam Rippon was one of the first openly gay male athletes to compete for the U.S. at the Winter Olympics.

Nathan Chen, a medal favorite who missed his chance on the podium this time around, still landed a record-breaking six quads in his final performance.

And Mirai Nagasu became the first female U.S. figure skater to land a triple axel at the Winter Olympics.

Several members of Team USA’s figure skating team at the Winter Olympics have made history at the Games this year, and fans have several more chances to see the skaters in action before they return to the U.S.

While Rippon and Chen have completed their competitions at the Olympics, the ice dance teams and female figure skaters still have chances to land on the podium at the Winter Games. The events come after several of these competitors helped the U.S. win bronze in the Team Event for figure skating.

Siblings Maia and Alex Shibutani lead the U.S.’s ice dance team in events beginning Monday, Feb. 19 in South Korea. They are joined by teammates Madison Chock and Evan Bates, and Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue. Medals will be awarded for ice dancing on Feb. 20 in Korea (or Feb. 19 in the U.S.)

Nagasu will also return to the ice for the U.S. in the ladies single skating competition, along with Bradie Tennell and Karen Chen.

Ice Dance

USA's Alex Shibutani and USA's Maia Shibutani compete in the figure skating team event ice dance short dance during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Gangneung Ice Arena in Gangneung on February 11, 2018.

USA's Alex Shibutani and USA's Maia Shibutani compete in the figure skating team event ice dance short dance during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Gangneung Ice Arena in Gangneung on February 11, 2018.

MLADEN ANTONOV—AFP/Getty Images

Short dance, the first event to determine the best ice dance teams at the Olympics, will begin Monday, Feb. 19 at 10 a.m. Korea time. That means it will air during primetime in the United States at 8 p.m. EST on Sunday, Feb. 18.

Next, the free dance event will take place at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 20 in Korea (or Monday, Feb. 19 at 8 p.m. EST).

After that, medals will be awarded to the top contenders.

Before you watch ice dancing, take the time to learn more about the event itself from Sochi’s 2014 champions, the U.S.’s Meryl Davis and Charlie White. (Hint: Ice dancing is a lot different from the pairs’ figure skating event.)

Ladies Single Skating

Mirai Nagasu of the U.S. competes in the Figure Skating Team Event Ladies Single Free Skating on day three of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games on Feb. 12, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea.

Mirai Nagasu of the U.S. competes in the Figure Skating Team Event Ladies Single Free Skating on day three of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games on Feb. 12, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea.

Xin Li—Getty Images

Nagasu, Tennell and Chen will compete in the short program for the ladies single skating competition on Wednesday, Feb. 21 at 10 a.m. in Korea (or, Tuesday, Feb. 20 at 8 p.m. EST).

They will then participate in the free skating event on Friday, Feb. 23 at 10 a.m. Korea time. That’s Thursday, Feb. 22 at 8 p.m. EST.

Medals will then be awarded for the top three figure skaters.

Time

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