South Sudan no longer in famine

Image copyright ALBERT GONZALEZ FARRAN Image caption There has been an increase in humanitarian assistance since famine was declares in February

South Sudan is no longer classified as being in famine following an increase in aid, a UN-backed report says.

However, the Integrated Security Phase Classification (IPC) report says 1.7 million people are still facing emergency levels of hunger, one step below famine.

The famine, announced in February, was the first be declared anywhere in the world since 2011.

Armed conflict, low harvests and soaring food prices have been blamed.

Tens of thousands of people have died and millions displaced since fighting erupted in the country more than three years ago.

The IPC report says the numbers at risk of starvation have increased to six million, up from 5.5 million last month.

The United Nations says the world is facing its biggest humanitarian crisis since the end of World War Two, with a total of nearly 20 million people facing starvation in north-east Nigeria, Somalia and Yemen, as well as South Sudan.

When is a famine declared?

The Integrated Phase Classification (IPC) system classes a famine as:

  • At least 20% of the population has access to fewer than 2,100 kilocalories of food a day
  • Acute malnutrition in more than 30% of children
  • Two deaths per 10,000 people, or four child deaths per 10,000 children every day

Why are there still famines?

BBC

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